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Credit: Scott Grafton

Network & Complexity Analysis

Human brain function can be characterized by localized properties (e.g., single cells or regions) as well as large-scale interregional circuits and networks. The fields of computer science, engineering and physics have a long history of developing approaches that allow one to characterize networks and complexity across such scales.

 Affiliated Faculty

Distinguished Professor
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Cognitive & neural mechanisms of human learning; Cognitive neuroscience; Mathematical psychology.
Professor
Physics
Cognitive neuroscience, learning, memory, categorization, decision processes in perception and cognition.
Distinguished Professor
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Dr. Gazzaniga is currently engaged in examining how codes play a role in understanding how neurons become mind.
Distinguished Professor
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Professor Grafton is interested in how people organize movement into goal-oriented action.
Distinguished Professor
Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Molecular and genetic perspectives on neuro-development, evolution, plasticity and degeneration
Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Next-generation wireless communication, sensing and inference; Robust, neuro-inspired machine learning.
Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research in Reproducible Computer Vision, Image Forensics and Deep Learning
Professor
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Dr. Miller is interested in the psychological and neural processes underlying human memory and decision-making.
Assistant Professor
Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology
Systems neuroscience, neuroethology, genetics. Dissecting neural circuits that control a motor sequence in fruit flies.
Associate Professor
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Exploring neural circuitry and illuminating its function, using new neurotechnology.